Comic Book Quick Look: Wonder Woman & More

by Eric Brown
Cover for Wonder Woman #759 and #760. Photo: DC Comics

I love comic books. There’s no way to go around it, despite my issues with the broken universe that is the DC Universe, I’ve enjoyed comic books for some years now, getting back in the hobby thanks to Linkara from Atop The Fourth Wall and Jonathan Hickman’s INFINITY. As such I wanted to give my brief thoughts in regards to some of the latest haul I’ve bought from my favorite retailer, Third Eye Comics.

Dark Nights: Death Metal: Guidebook

Solid tie-in that showcases the defeat of Earth’s Heroes and the transformation into The Batman Who Laughs’ personal domain.

Some of the biggest highlights include the first chapter in this, and the return of Poison Ivy, who had disappeared after the events of Poison Ivy/Harley Quinn, and seems to be the same character despite merging with her evil half because comic books.

Harley Quinn #75

The final issue of Harley Quinn’s Solo series that started back in The Rebirth Age. I haven’t read any of the previous issues except #74, which many accused DC of trying to hook up Booster Gold and Harley and leaving Ivy in the cold.

This…this doesn’t even address the last issue, and features a mini-tie-in connection with The Joker War storyline in Batman.

The common complaint by fans is DC trying to make Harley Quinn their answer to Deadpool.

Batman #97

The third chapter in The Joker War arc, as The Joker and Punchline continue their plot to kill Batman, Harley Quinn helps out in using some Poison Ivy formula to remove the Joker Toxin from Batman’s system so he doesn’t continue pulling his Daredevil Impression to punch zombified Joker goons.

Oh and Clownhunter roasted some inside the Batmobile.

Nightwing #73

Tie-In to Batman: Joker War Event, with Dicky Boy facing Batgirl, who in her series is crippled again but you know, timeline broken.

So, Joker created his own version of Fight Pit before Joker War, as Tynion IV stated all the tie-ins happened before Joker War, which raises timeline questions since I mentioned Barbara is crippled again in Batgirl and none at any time has Batman in contact with Barbara about that.

Artwork is solid though.

Wonder Woman Annual #4

The conclusion to Steve Orlando’s 10 Issue run on Wonder Woman, I mainly had bought this and some of Orlando’s issues because Donna Troy, one of my favorite DC characters, was in this as her first appearance in the DC Universe since her return to normal from The Batman Who Laughs. 

Variant cover by Jim Lee for Wonder Woman #759. Photo: DC Comics
Variant cover by Jim Lee for Wonder Woman #759. Photo: DC Comics

Wonder Woman #759

Tamaki’s start on Wonder Woman, featuring the return of Maxwell Lord. As part of the company’s quest to confuse its readers, they mention his death at the hands of Diana in the Pre-New 52 DCU during the road to Infinite Crisis. But that doesn’t make any sense because as far we’ve been informed in this, Wonder Woman never killed Maxwell Lord.

Also, the artist of this book generates mixed views for me, not saying the artwork is bad, it’s just, much like his work on Batman, I’m half the time thinking there’s going to be a dialogue option since it’s very reminiscent to Telltale’s Batman games.

Variant cover by Josh Middleton for Wonder Woman #760. Photo: DC Comics
Variant cover by Josh Middleton for Wonder Woman #760. Photo: DC Comics

Wonder Woman #760

Did I forget to mention this went back to the previous numbering when #750 hit. This is confusing since I would assume it would be re-numbered in the 800th overall issue of Wonder Woman.

Maxwell Lord is trying to get Diana to see he isn’t the villain in this, though likely he’ll be double crossing her at the end of all this.

Telltale Games’ Batman art design is obvious.

Wonder Woman: Dead Earth #4

The final issue in the series under the DC Black Label branding. I haven’t read this series yet as I wanted to plan binge-reading them for a complete experience since this came every alternate month.

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